The Azure Heights Forum


Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply
my profile | search | faq | forum home
  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» The Azure Heights Forum   » The Courtyard   » Karp Park   » itt you recommend a book on data structures

UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: itt you recommend a book on data structures
Lark84
My skeleton is made of creamy nougat.
Member # 1186

Member Rated:
posted 10-25-2007 04:01 PM      Profile for Lark84     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I need to learn about algorithms and data structures. Since I'm pretty sure most of you have some kind of background in computer science and probably have spent at least some time buried in a book about these things, why not throw out the question and see if I get an answer?

(if you don't want to read the rest of this unnecessarily long post, just blurt out a book title and I'll check it out for myself)

I'm not looking for a "Implementing data structures in language X" type book, but rather something akin to "Data structures and algorithms explained, in general". I'd prefer some kind of easy-to-understand pseudocode rather than syntactically correct gibberish in a programming language I don't know (that is, most of them - I used to know a little Java back in the day though).

Ideally, the book would:

- explain things carefully. (I'm a newbie at this)

- have informative examples, diagrams and illustrative pictures.

- not be very centered on abstract math - I guess math is needed to really give a good foundation in this subject, but math usually gives me a headache ("then don't study computer science", but I have to, you see, otherwise the garden gnomes punish me) when it is (as is all too common) just lines and lines of symbols strung together without any further explanation. Don't misunderstand me - I'd love for the book to explain the mathematical concepts in detail, I just like text and diagrams (see item 2) better than LaTeX-fu.

- be written in a not-too-formal tone, and fun to read.

Well, that's it. Post your suggestions, folks.

Registered: Nov 2000  |  IP: Logged
10,000Lb.Snorlax
loves long time.
Member # 13

Member Rated:
posted 10-25-2007 06:21 PM      Profile for 10,000Lb.Snorlax   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
'I guess math is needed to really give a good foundation in this subject'
nah.

I'm a little surprised that you are adverse to a
language book as I think it would be easier for you to conceptualize the ideas through code, and until you can actually use data structures and play with them in code there's only so much you can learn.

I personally would have a hard time teaching someone data structures without the medium of a programming language.

and no I can't really recommend you one [Frown]

if I were you I would google CS Data Structures course Textbook and go to all the .cs.edu entries. See what the 200 level CS courses are assigning.

The one I had back in college was pretty good - I'm sorry but I don't remember what it was

From: Denver | Registered: Feb 2000  |  IP: Logged
MewtwoSama
Asshole
Member # 12

Member Rated:
posted 10-26-2007 09:26 PM      Profile for MewtwoSama   Author's Homepage   Email MewtwoSama   Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by 10,000Lb.Snorlax:

The one I had back in college was pretty good - I'm sorry but I don't remember what it was

Isnt it irrelevant by now anyway?

- - - - -
Hade ni ikuze!

From: Abyss of Evil | Registered: Feb 2000  |  IP: Logged
10,000Lb.Snorlax
loves long time.
Member # 13

Member Rated:
posted 10-31-2007 12:25 PM      Profile for 10,000Lb.Snorlax   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Nah - data structures will be around forever as will their implementation in C++ (-what the book was about).

I remember programmatic concepts were fascinating to learn about. If you are interested in such things lark I would recommend investigating design patterns in software development also.

From: Denver | Registered: Feb 2000  |  IP: Logged
Lark84
My skeleton is made of creamy nougat.
Member # 1186

Member Rated:
posted 11-03-2007 07:04 AM      Profile for Lark84     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by 10,000Lb.Snorlax:
data structures will be around forever as will their implementation

Yeah, from what I've learned about the subject so far, for some problems (like sorting a list) you can prove that algorithm X is the most efficient method, ever - thus, algorithm X will never go away, it will only require implementation in different programming languages.

Of course, if civilization were to crumble, it is unlikely that sorting a list in the most effective manner will be of high priority, but algorithm X will still be the best way to do it.

Registered: Nov 2000  |  IP: Logged


All times are ET (US)  
Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply Close Topic    Move Topic    Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | Azure Heights Pokémon Laboratory

© 2000-2016, Maximum Penetration Industries.

Karpe Diem


The views and opinions expressed on this page are strictly those of the author(s). The contents and links have not been reviewed or approved by the University of Miami.