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Author Topic: Full Paralysis Questions
Slo Migs
Farting Nudist
Member # 110

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posted 04-25-2000 06:54 PM      Profile for Slo Migs   Author's Homepage   Email Slo Migs   Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Question #1: Does anyone know what the formula and/or conditions are for determining whether or not a Pokemon becomes fully paralyzed on a turn?

Question #2: Do the speeds of the paralyzed pokemon and/or the speed of the paralyzing pokemon have anything to do with increasing or decreasing the chance of being fully paralyzed?

I haven't tested this or anything, but judging by observation from playing the game, it seems like the chances for full paralyzation increase when the paralyzed pokemon is slower than the attacker. Is there some basis in this or am I just jumping to conclusions?

Question #3: Does getting attacked or not getting attacked affect full paralyzation?

Again, merely an observation, but it seems like pokemon get fully paralyzed more often when the attacker performs a move that does not do damage (i.e. Double Team, Amnesia)

Question #3: Well this isn't really a question, but more of a hypothesis. What if full paralysis is based on a random number from 1 to 4 and each number corresponds to one of your pokemon's attacks? Full paralyzation then occurs if the selected move and the random number match. So, for example, if you use the move that's in slot 1 and the random number generator falls on 1, the result would be a fully paralyzed pokemon. I know this sounds farfetched but it actually makes sense in a way. It means that every paralyzed pokemon has a 25% chance of being fully paralyzed each turn.

Of course there's no real way to test my hypothesis, except if there was some way of finding out if a random number generator starts up when a pokemon is given the paralysis status.

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From: Los Angeles, California | Registered: Mar 2000  |  IP: Logged
Mr. K
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posted 04-25-2000 08:03 PM      Profile for Mr. K   Author's Homepage   Email Mr. K   Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The PAR page should be available for consumption soon, but Wintermute's data suggested that it's totally random, and roughly 25%.

I don't think he tested your different attack theory, tho.

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From: Cinnabar Island | Registered: Feb 2000  |  IP: Logged
zapjol
Farting Nudist
Member # 236

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posted 04-25-2000 09:17 PM      Profile for zapjol     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I have semi tested this and if you use an attack and they fully paralized use it again and they are fully parilized again. btw I did this on statium so it is probely diferent on statium. I also noticed that when the oponit was fully parilized the last turn then a one hit KO move is more likely to hit.

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From: The top of Mt. Olympus | Registered: Apr 2000  |  IP: Logged
Wintermute
My custom title sucks.
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posted 04-26-2000 01:32 AM      Profile for Wintermute   Author's Homepage   Email Wintermute   Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Question #3: Does getting attacked or not getting attacked affect full paralyzation?

Again, merely an observation, but it seems like pokemon get fully paralyzed more often when the attacker performs a move that does not do damage (i.e. Double Team, Amnesia)

I don't think so. Among the various samples I collected I found rates of full paralysis that ranged from about 1/5 to about 1/3, but in all of these cases, the enemy was simply Recovering the whole time. If non-damaging moves were an influence, you'd think it would have pulled the rates to one end or the other of the range. I suppose it's possible that if damaging moves had been used, the mean of the range might have shifted, so that the range would become 1/10 to 2/10, for example.

I find that hypothesis implausible mainly because the first range seems to encompass nearly anyone's experience with paralysis. Yet in normal combat situations, paralyzed pokemon are probably getting hit most of the time.

It may be worth checking, though.

Question #[4]...

Of course there's no real way to test my hypothesis, except if there was some way of finding out if a random number generator starts up when a pokemon is given the paralysis status.

Yeah, if I'm thinking about it clearly enough, there'd be no practical difference between what you propose, and a simple random 1 in 4 chance.

I think it would be possible to check by doing quick saves on an emulator, but again, I don't see that there would be any practical value in learning this.


From: Winnipeg, Manitoba | Registered: Feb 2000  |  IP: Logged
cfalcon
OLDNBLD
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posted 04-26-2000 02:00 AM      Profile for cfalcon   Email cfalcon   Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 

Actually, he is implying that the paralysis move is constant over the course of paralysis:

Moveset:
Move A
Move B
Move C
Move D

if Moveset has PAR attached, then the hypothesis is that one of the move is marked as "skip turn" internally, and that this move is not changed round to round (if it were, there would be no difference).

I don't believe this is the case, but I would want to test it.

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-cfalcon


From: 39°45' N, 104°52' W | Registered: Feb 2000  |  IP: Logged
Wintermute
My custom title sucks.
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posted 04-26-2000 05:35 AM      Profile for Wintermute   Author's Homepage   Email Wintermute   Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Actually, he is implying that the paralysis move is constant over the course of paralysis:

Moveset:
Move A
Move B
Move C
Move D

if Moveset has PAR attached, then the hypothesis is that one of the move is marked as "skip turn" internally, and that this move is not changed round to round (if it were, there would be no difference).

I don't believe this is the case, but I would want to test it.

Hmm. I considered that he might have meant that. I think it's ambiguous, but then I seem to be having problems in this area lately.

I don't think it's the case either, but I'm afraid I don't see the point in testing it: I can't help but regard it as flat-out impossible (i.e. that it IS programmed this way, not that it could be). For both pokémon used in the 2k tests (or so) that I've done on this, I would exhaust all the PP on Move A, then switch to Move B, etc.

I'm sure I would have noticed if 20 consecutive rounds were full paralysis, then 20 were not, etc.


From: Winnipeg, Manitoba | Registered: Feb 2000  |  IP: Logged
Slo Migs
Farting Nudist
Member # 110

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posted 04-26-2000 09:38 AM      Profile for Slo Migs   Author's Homepage   Email Slo Migs   Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
You guys the gist of what I was theorizing, but not quite. cfalcon, you're right on about your interpretation, except that I think that the "skip move" changes each turn. It's basically like a game of Russian roulette. If you land on the marked move, then you get paralyzed. Next turn, another radom number is generated and we begin the process again.

Like I said though, it's farfetched(Dux?) almost impossible to test and it wouldn't help anyone out anyways in terms of gameplay. So I doubt it'd be worth anyone's time to study it. But me, I just like figuring out how stuff works. Maybe if I hadn't dropped out of the Computer Science major last year, I would've benna bit more helpful. Heh

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"It's all fun and games until someone gets hurt. Then it's just fun"


From: Los Angeles, California | Registered: Mar 2000  |  IP: Logged
PoKamek
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posted 04-26-2000 11:46 AM      Profile for PoKamek   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Try booting up an emulator and using save states to test this theory. Save a state after you paralyze the enemy and it's your turn again, then try all four moves with the same save state and find out what happens. If it gets paralyzed on one, try the same move with the save state again. If it only paralyzes on a certain move, then that's the "stop move" for that turn. If it doesn't paralyze at all, or if it's paralyzed more than once, then it's probably random.

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Kamek, Master Magikoopa
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From: Koopa Kingdom | Registered: Apr 2000  |  IP: Logged
NeoSyrex
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posted 04-26-2000 12:16 PM      Profile for NeoSyrex   Author's Homepage   Email NeoSyrex   Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I don't understand why the programmers would put so much effort for a simple 1-in-4 random occurance. With a normal 1-in-4 occurance, a random number is drawn and if the number is 25% of the random number, the pokémon is paralyzed. With your theory, not only would they have the 1-in-4 code to determine what attack is chosen, but also more code to determine what attack is chosen, and if the attack used matches this attack or not to see if the pokémon is paralyzed. Seems like too much unnecessary work to me.

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NeoSyrex™
[ NeoSyrex@hotmail.com ]

[This message has been edited by NeoSyrex (edited 04-26-2000).]


From: New Jersey, USA | Registered: Feb 2000  |  IP: Logged
cfalcon
OLDNBLD
Member # 19

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posted 04-26-2000 04:17 PM      Profile for cfalcon   Email cfalcon   Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 

Yes, I suppose you would have noticed being fully paralyzed 20 turns in a row

What you meant to say wasn't that it isn't worthwhile testing, but that you had already tested it quite well, and found it to be false.

Yea, try the simple savestate thing. It isn't important in normal gameplay unless it sticks with the move for more than one round (if they picked a new one every two rounds).

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-cfalcon


From: 39°45' N, 104°52' W | Registered: Feb 2000  |  IP: Logged
Givera
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Member # 234

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posted 04-26-2000 10:30 PM      Profile for Givera   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
What you could try is make a quick save and try a given attack then reload and try the SAME attack again - of course the paralyzed attack might be determined after attacks are decided so you would really need to try at a lot of different times... But I don't understand why they would go through all that trouble of picking a random move etc. - It would result in the same chance as a random 25% "die roll".
-Givera, hacker of platinum pokemon

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From: Plano, Tx | Registered: Apr 2000  |  IP: Logged


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